B Major

The Notes in the B Major Scale are as follows:
B C# D# E F# G# A#

Progression Examples:

1. B5 E5 F#5
2. B E G#m7 F#
3. E F# G#m7 F# B
4. C#5 F#5 B5
5. B G#m7 C#m F#
6. B G#m7 F# E
7. B G#m7 E F#
8. B G#m7 D#m E F# E F# B

Joe Satriani’s piece called “Always with Me, Always with You” is in B Major but then goes into B Minor in an awesome transition. Its a pretty simple transition but the power of simplicity is in effect here as this song, melody and solo is in my opinion one of his classics.

Listening examples
Verdi’s opera Rigoletto is in B major.
Johannes Brahms’s Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 8 is in B major, though the piece ends in B minor.

Assignment:

Lets go backwards this time. Pick an easy progression from B Minor then pick a nice long progression from B Major then come back and play the B Minor progression right after, just like it does in the song right after the solo. Only the sections are reversed, B Major, B Minor and then ends in B Major. You can do it this way too.

 

G# Minor – the Relative Minor Key of B Major

The Notes in the G# Minor Scale are as follows:
G# A# B C# D# E F#

Progression Examples:

1. G#m C#m E C#m7
2. G#m A#dim C#m7 D#m7
3. G#5 A#b5 D#5
4. G#m E C#m D#m7
5. G#5 C#5 D#5 E5 D#5
6. G#m E A#dim D#m7
7. A#dim D#m7 G#m
8. G#m C#m F# B E A#dim D#m7

 

Listening examples
Polonaise in G-Sharp Minor, opus posthumous in 1822. Chopin.
Étude No. 6 – Chopin
La campanella from his Grandes études de Paganini – Franz Liszt

Assignment: Write a progression on paper of 5-8 chords. Once you have these chords, use a C#m7 next, as the 5th chord of F#m. (enharmonic equivalent) and write the next 4 – 5 chords in the key of F#m. This is called Modulation from one key to another.

You should have a smoking progression.