G#/A FLAT HARMONIC MINOR

 

The G# Harmonic Minor Scale degrees are the following: G# A# B C# D# E G.

Ab Harmonic Minor Scale consists of the following degrees: Ab Bb Cb Db Eb Fb G. This is why we use G# Harmonic Minor. Its easier to read and spell on a staff.

Chord formula for this scale is as follows: i iio7 III+ iv V VI viio7 aka 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

The chord qualities of these chords are:

Minor – Diminished – Augmented – Minor – Major – Major – Diminished.

 

EXAMPLE PROGRESSIONS IN G# HARMONIC MINOR:

 

The Chords built from the scale are: G#m A#o B+ C#m D# E Go

Note that the A#o (iio) is fully diminished. It is built with minor 3rds only. So is the Go. Fully diminished means the chord has a double flat 7 (bb7). In this case it would be G. The chord looks like this – A# C# E G – all minor 3rds apart.

Progressions:

  • i iv V
  • i iio7 V i
  • i V VI V7 i
  • i VI iio7 V7 i
  • i iv viio7 III+ VI iio7 V7 i

 

So if you were to play in G# harmonic minor, the chord progressions would look like this:

 

Progression 1

G# minor, C# minor and D# major.

For progression 2 you would have the following:

A# diminished 7th, D# major, G# minor. AKA 2 – 5 – 1 progression.

Progression 3 is:

G# minor, D# major, E major, D#7 (dominant 7th), G# minor.

 

Progression 4 is:

G# minor, E major, A# diminished 7th, D#7, G# minor.

 

Progression 5 is a circle of fourths progression.

Notice that the 2nd chord of the progression is a 4th (in intervals) away from the G#. Its C#m. You can also look at it like 4 letter notes away. G#, A#, B, C#. Simply look at the scale and count from G# up 4 notes. G# is 1, A# is 2, B is 3 and C# is 4. This method of counting works for any key. So the progression continues to move up in intervals of 4. (2 whole steps and a half step) or (5 half steps).

Here is the progression: G# minor, C# minor, G diminished 7th, B augmented, E major, A# diminished 7th, D#7, and G# minor.

Here it is again.

G#m, C#m, Gdim7, B+, E, A#dim7, D#7, G#m.

From the i chord, up the scale in 4ths, leaves you back at the i chord with a perfect authentic cadence. (D#7 – G#m)

Now lets say you wanted to improvise over this progression or any other one for that matter in this key. You would need to know the scale solid. If you dont know the scale for instance, its listed right here, write out the scale 10 times on a sheet of paper or do it on staff paper. Preferably on staff paper – even if its a little harder.

 

G#, A#, B, C#, D#, E G. = G# Harmonic Minor.

You would also need to know the tones for each chord. Each chord is normally made up of 3 tones. This is why they are called triads. You should also do this exercise 10 times to really know your chord tones.

G#m = G# B D#

A#dim7 = A# C# E G

B+ = B D# G

C#m = C# E G#

D#7 = D# G A# C#

E = E G# B

Gdim7 = G A# C# E (same as A#dim7 above, just starting from the G note)

GO through these chords, progressions and chord tones as much as you need to, until its solidified in your brain. Key word is solidified.

 

Side note for kicks:

You can easily modulate to E major here. Heres an example: Lets take progression 1 and modulate to E Major.

G# minor, C# minor and D# major and back to G# minor. We can now go from G# minor straight to E major, add a B7 (V7 in the key of E major) and an E major chord to establish the new key. In this case the G# minor chord acts as the iii chord of E Major. ( E F# G# A B C# D# half dim)

Progression now looks like this:

G#m, C#m, D#, G#m, E, B7, E.

We have started in G# harmonic minor and have ended the progression in E Major by using the VI chord (E major) as the pivot chord. We can do this because the E Major is present in both keys.

Just wanted to throw that in there. You can now keep going in E Major or you can go back to G# harmonic minor. You could even modulate to another key, or you can simply leave the progression how it is above.

Okay lets move on…kick some ass, and write some music.